Forum for all other samplers including Maschine, MVs, Akai S & Z series, Emu, Roland, Yamaha, Korg, Boss, Ensoniq... and even Beat Thang.
By djslaughter808 Wed Oct 12, 2016 12:30 am
Okay guys I have an idea and I'm being 100% serious right now! Instead of waiting on akai, Native Instruments, Pioneer, etc. to make the production Workstation we want, why don't we all come together and brainstorm some ideas, eliminate the bad ideas, create a gofundme account and make our own production Workstation? I have a ton of ideas already! I've had this idea for over a year now. Seriously let's discuss something. :wink:
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By Lampdog Wed Oct 12, 2016 5:38 pm
djslaughter808 wrote:
Lampdog wrote:Why haven't you started production then.


That's why I'm asking that we get together. I can't do this alone. I know nothing about building electronics. I just have the ideas :-D

But unlike Sway you have all the answers.

jk. I understand.
By djslaughter808 Wed Oct 12, 2016 5:40 pm
Lampdog wrote:
djslaughter808 wrote:
Lampdog wrote:Why haven't you started production then.


That's why I'm asking that we get together. I can't do this alone. I know nothing about building electronics. I just have the ideas :-D

But unlike Sway you have all the answers.

jk. I understand.


Just throwing out my 2 cents lol
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By inflict3 Thu Oct 13, 2016 4:51 pm
**** wrote:Hell no, just get a Beat Thang and call it a day...

:mrgreen:


Hahahahhahaha.... And make wack beats with ur **** glitching out all day..
By jahsoul Thu Oct 20, 2016 9:34 pm
Lampdog wrote:Why haven't you started production then.

Man, I swear I wish it was that easy. I still swear up and down that I created the concept of the MPC Ren. :lol:

Snippet from pitch letter I wrote to Akai in Jan 2010 wrote:The concept of the MPC-S is taking the MPC and making the Akai OS computer software. Because the MPC 1000 is the size of a notebook computer, it is the perfect template for the controller. In fact, the hardware of the MPC 1000 doesn’t change. Every button, knob, Q-Link faders, screen, and even the sound card (which will be explained a little later) will not change. The only differences the MPC 1000 and the MPC-S hardware controller would have are the compact flash card slot/hard drive opening and power outlet. Everything on the hardware will keep its function and the screen will use the same UI as the current Akai OS for every function of the hardware. The controller would be bus powered and would also be the interface for the sound card. A feature that will set the controller light years ahead of the rest would be the sound card. It will work as an USB audio interface, which will continue to give the MPC-S the authentic MPC feel. The audio interface will keep the record in, audio out, front headphone jack, digital in and out, and 2 midi in and midi out. The only changes to the audio interface would be the 2 balanced inputs and 2 balanced outputs. This allows users to connect all audio devices to their MPC-S hardware controller and keep all addition hardware integrated with the hardware/software combo. The MPC-S hardware controller would also act as the dongle, being the only way the software would be functional, with one needing the other.

The computer software would represent everything that is done on the hardware controller. It will incorporate everything the MPC is known for, such as the sampling features, the MPC “swing” and song sequencing. Users can sample, time stretch, perform auto-chop, make programs, and make songs just like they would on the MPC 1000. All samples, loops, programs, sequences, and songs can be accessed quickly with everything on the screen. Because it is computer software, many more features would be included. A few added features would be the addition of more effects, VST in the software environment, and vintage mode. One complaint that many users have always complained about was the lack of effects that was offered on the MPC, and many users would sample into a primary sampler before recording into the MPC. The MPC-S software would take away the need for a primary sampler by adding effects that’s on many of the popular DAWs that have been released in recent years. The ability to use VSTs in the software environment is one area Native Instruments fell short in when they created the Maschine. Users of the Maschine have to use midi workarounds, which takes away from the workflow. Allowing users to have VSTs in the environment gives them access to countless sounds and instruments while speeding up workflow. The vintage sampler mode has been a request for many years. There is a reemergence of the old, low bit sounds that were found in older samplers, such as the Akai MPC 60, EMU SP 1200, and Ensoniq ASR Pro. This vintage mode would emulate these sounds perfectly through component modeling of the actual units' sound engine and output circuits. A major application that could be implemented into the software would be the click and drag of the completed arrangement in song mode. This feature would give the user the option to click a marker over the song mode window, and this would convert every track from midi to audio and the ability to drag each sequence into any DAW to finish the music production process.


:(
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By Icepulse Sat Oct 22, 2016 1:03 am
jahsoul wrote:
Lampdog wrote:Why haven't you started production then.

Man, I swear I wish it was that easy. I still swear up and down that I created the concept of the MPC Ren. :lol:

Snippet from pitch letter I wrote to Akai in Jan 2010 wrote:The concept of the MPC-S is taking the MPC and making the Akai OS computer software. Because the MPC 1000 is the size of a notebook computer, it is the perfect template for the controller. In fact, the hardware of the MPC 1000 doesn’t change. Every button, knob, Q-Link faders, screen, and even the sound card (which will be explained a little later) will not change. The only differences the MPC 1000 and the MPC-S hardware controller would have are the compact flash card slot/hard drive opening and power outlet. Everything on the hardware will keep its function and the screen will use the same UI as the current Akai OS for every function of the hardware. The controller would be bus powered and would also be the interface for the sound card. A feature that will set the controller light years ahead of the rest would be the sound card. It will work as an USB audio interface, which will continue to give the MPC-S the authentic MPC feel. The audio interface will keep the record in, audio out, front headphone jack, digital in and out, and 2 midi in and midi out. The only changes to the audio interface would be the 2 balanced inputs and 2 balanced outputs. This allows users to connect all audio devices to their MPC-S hardware controller and keep all addition hardware integrated with the hardware/software combo. The MPC-S hardware controller would also act as the dongle, being the only way the software would be functional, with one needing the other.

The computer software would represent everything that is done on the hardware controller. It will incorporate everything the MPC is known for, such as the sampling features, the MPC “swing” and song sequencing. Users can sample, time stretch, perform auto-chop, make programs, and make songs just like they would on the MPC 1000. All samples, loops, programs, sequences, and songs can be accessed quickly with everything on the screen. Because it is computer software, many more features would be included. A few added features would be the addition of more effects, VST in the software environment, and vintage mode. One complaint that many users have always complained about was the lack of effects that was offered on the MPC, and many users would sample into a primary sampler before recording into the MPC. The MPC-S software would take away the need for a primary sampler by adding effects that’s on many of the popular DAWs that have been released in recent years. The ability to use VSTs in the software environment is one area Native Instruments fell short in when they created the Maschine. Users of the Maschine have to use midi workarounds, which takes away from the workflow. Allowing users to have VSTs in the environment gives them access to countless sounds and instruments while speeding up workflow. The vintage sampler mode has been a request for many years. There is a reemergence of the old, low bit sounds that were found in older samplers, such as the Akai MPC 60, EMU SP 1200, and Ensoniq ASR Pro. This vintage mode would emulate these sounds perfectly through component modeling of the actual units' sound engine and output circuits. A major application that could be implemented into the software would be the click and drag of the completed arrangement in song mode. This feature would give the user the option to click a marker over the song mode window, and this would convert every track from midi to audio and the ability to drag each sequence into any DAW to finish the music production process.


:(


It's all well and good, but I have it on some good info, from a friend of a friend down w/ the DITC crew who does beta w/ Akai that we're likely to be very happy soon.

That's all I got. Take it w/ a grain, yo.
By coolderb Thu Nov 03, 2016 10:31 pm
djslaughter808 wrote:Ok let me add my 2 cents. I literally heard about this product today (October 11, 2016) and I immediately got excited because this is exactly what I wanted, a Stand Alone production Workstation. At least that's what I thought this was, until I read reviews and peeked at different forms like this one. I thought this was going to be what MPC should have done with the MPC touch. But apparently after reading, it is miles away from that. But I will say this, this product does have some potential. It is at least a step in the right direction. I see great things coming from this. Either pioneer expands on this product and make it better and add more features or companies like Native Instruments and akai will step up and make a modern stand-alone production Workstation that we all want. Yes this product is disappointing but I do think we are headed in the right direction. Of course we have to remember that Pioneer DJ is just a company that makes DJ equipment, so we can't expect them to give us producers everything we want, but I will give them kudos for trying. As far as the price, I really do think that Pioneer is reaching. It's not even worth half that. For $1,500 I should be able to not ever turn on my laptop for production ever again. I mean beaterator for the PSP can do a lot more than this sampler can do, and that's about as basic as you can get as far as music production goes. But I am excited to see what comes about. Hopefully this will put fire under Akai's and Native Instruments' butt. Let's just wait and see what happens. :popcorn:


I don't understand how this will put a fire under Akai and N.I.'s butts seeing as how from all accounts it is over-priced, under-featured and seems to be geared towards the D.J. market rather than Production. If anything it would make N.I. less likely to go the standalone route (which would directly compete with their software/controller cash cow) and Akai is breathing a sigh of relief because so many were hailing the Toraiz as the standalone MPC-killer that Akai should have built. Now Akai is in no rush to make their next move. They can take their good ole time with the 2.0 release and possibly work on the hybrid prototype they demoed a few years ago.
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By mrwulf Mon Nov 14, 2016 1:54 pm
let's hope the MPC life lives up to the expectations:
- rock solid construction (the Pioneer is built very well!)
- stable software
- no softtouch housing/cover (this stuff suverts itself in a few years and you can use it as a glue)
- not overpriced


I've been looking into buying an old MPC 4000 or a Roland MV or a Pioneer Toraiz SP-16 as all recent Akai software controllers are just 2nd class "me-too" products and not the tanks Akai built in the past. But now I should wait for the MPC Life to make my decision even more difficult. :mrgreen: