Support and discussion about Akai's next generation of standalone MPCs running the MPC Software 2.0
By justineastwick Tue Feb 13, 2018 2:14 am
Just downloaded and read the MPC X and MPC Live Bible by MPC-Tutor - learned some cool things that were definitely awesome and beneficial for me, but still trying to wrap my head around some things discussed in the eBook:

Trying to build a kit based off samples taken from the TR-626 drum machine - still trying to get that "SOFT-MEDI-HARD" variation mastered with my open and closed hi-hat, snare, cymbal, hand clap and kick (as I only have one of each type of sample).

Trying to figure out how can I go about about getting "different-sounding" variations of the same sample to use in more than one project (if that makes sense). For instance, I want to use the original TR-626 snare to make some other "different-sounding" samples, so I'll have a library of snare samples to choose from when I'm working on a new project.

I was thinking that I should I start by increasing/decreasing the amount of semitones to change the overall sound of the sample. Would this be a good place to start?

Thanks for any feedback.
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By MPC-Tutor Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:44 am
There's a section about velocity sensitive emulation in chapter 17 (page 330 onwards) which explains some ways to emulate changes in timbre. There we're mostly using the velocity sensitive program features but you can use the theory to also create your own 'standalone' variations, e.g. very subtle tuning change (not semitones, much smaller), attack changes (for softer sounds), shorter decay (for softer sounds), low pass filter, LFO (noise modulating filter is mentioned a couple of times in the book, this produces a randomly changing timbre). You could also use layering to introduce subtle timbre changes.

Then use 'flatten pad' to create the samples from these which can then be used within cycle layers.

I also assume your TR 626 itself can also allow for changes to the drum sound, so you could generate some variations at source.

I was thinking of creating an additional section in chapter 17 to specifically underline this usage in cycle kits, but ultimately the info to reference is in chapter 17 as well as chapter 21
By justineastwick Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:00 pm
MPC-Tutor wrote:There's a section about velocity sensitive emulation in chapter 17 (page 330 onwards) which explains some ways to emulate changes in timbre. There we're mostly using the velocity sensitive program features but you can use the theory to also create your own 'standalone' variations, e.g. very subtle tuning change (not semitones, much smaller), attack changes (for softer sounds), shorter decay (for softer sounds), low pass filter, LFO (noise modulating filter is mentioned a couple of times in the book, this produces a randomly changing timbre). You could also use layering to introduce subtle timbre changes.

Then use 'flatten pad' to create the samples from these which can then be used within cycle layers.

I also assume your TR 626 itself can also allow for changes to the drum sound, so you could generate some variations at source.

I was thinking of creating an additional section in chapter 17 to specifically underline this usage in cycle kits, but ultimately the info to reference is in chapter 17 as well as chapter 21


Yup, I read that section. I am using the FINE tune to change the pitch of the sample (as SEMI was too drastic for my taste). Made another snare drum that I like - layered it on top of the tambourine to give it a west coast vibe... LOL. This FLATTEN PAD thing is pretty cool - will try the kick drum next!

Next, I’m going to try to make some ghost snares and flams!