Talk about the music biz - marketing, promotions, contract law, copyright etc...
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By EnochLight Mon Feb 03, 2020 8:46 pm
Billie Eilish’s brother and producer Finneas explains why he prefers recording at home to being in a “fancy-ass” studio.

“It takes them a f**king hour to get the aux cord working!”

https://www.musicradar.com/news/billie- ... ass-studio

Since Billie Eilish swept the Grammy Awards last week, attention has refocused on the fact that all her music so far has been recorded with her brother, Finneas, at their family home in LA.

This appears to have come as a surprise to some - which, in this day and age, is actually kind of surprising in itself - prompting Finneas to take to Twitter to explain why he prefers working in his own space.

“People act like recording billie’s album in my bedroom was difficult but in reality, every time I’m in a fancy ass studio it takes them a **** hour to get the aux cord working,” he said.

The implication, of course, is that being around your own gear in a place that you feel comfortable often yields better results than putting yourself in an environment that’s alien to you. His words provide further reassurance, if it was required, that getting into a ‘pro’ studio is no longer necessary if you want to make a record.

Whether the massive success of his sister’s debut album will lead Finneas to reevaluate his recording setup in the future remains to be seen, but taking the DIY approach certainly hasn’t held him back so far.


Image

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By JUKE 179r Tue Feb 04, 2020 1:42 pm
peterpiper wrote:Question: Is the age of the "pro studio" at an end?

Answer: No


Another Question: Do you need a 'pro studio' to record an top selling album?

Answer: No.


peace

Word...
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By CharlesRandolph Tue Feb 04, 2020 4:12 pm
But the album was mixed by Rob Kinelski https://www.robkinelski.com/ and Mastered by John Greenham: http://www.johngreenham.com/ - Two Pros, who use Pro Studios. :lol: The thing about Billie Eilish and Finneas O'Connell is not all DIY. It's still has a polished sound, the videos are polished, the images are polished, and Marketing is polished.

Her mother and father are Maggie May Baird and Patrick O'Connell, who's been in Hollywood since the early 1980. They know the game. So this isn't, just some random brother and sister who came out of no where.

This is not a knock at what they created and their process, but they have access and are being pushed by a machine. They're not recording vocals with a SM58, into 4 track tape recorder like Cody Chesnutt. Also you should never compose the the music in a Pro Studio. Unless you need the recording space.

Take to a project studio and lay down the vocals, and clean things up. If your project studio doesn't allow for the results you want.
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By EnochLight Tue Feb 04, 2020 6:36 pm
Their situation isn't unique. Since the democratization of music production, you'll see more and more hits written and recorded in someone's bedroom - and likely mixed and mastered similarly. One only needs to review the countless corpses of "pro studios" that have closed their doors across the nation (no, the world) over the past 20 years.
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By CharlesRandolph Wed Feb 05, 2020 7:39 am
More people are using project studios, however in the last couple year, many cities has been cracking down on home studios, being used for commercial business. In Los Angeles, Commercial music studios aren't allowed in residential zones. I have many friends, especially those who live in Nashville, who are getting cease and desist letters.
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By CharlesRandolph Wed Feb 05, 2020 11:22 am
Cockdiesel wrote:They been saying this for 20 years now... same as it ever was...


It's an up and down things, because people will run out of money, space, patience, or all three. Look at all the gear on eBay, Reverb, and Craigslist. The home of lost money, broken dreams, and no time. :lol:
By Cockdiesel Wed Feb 05, 2020 4:05 pm
Hard to laugh off reality but that’s pretty much my experience. Wasn’t until I started running low on money, time etc that It really set in you don’t really need much except the discipline and will power. Still working on that one though... LOL
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By CharlesRandolph Wed Feb 05, 2020 4:47 pm
Cockdiesel wrote:Hard to laugh off reality but that’s pretty much my experience. Wasn’t until I started running low on money, time etc that It really set in you don’t really need much except the discipline and will power. Still working on that one though... LOL


It all depends on what the focus is. People see commercial studios and think they need all that stuff. Just talk to some commercial studio engineers and they all will tell you, less is more but always buy quality. The truth is not everyone wants to be a tracking, mixing or mastering engineer. Some just want to be musician, composers, vocalist.

They really don't want deal with all kinds of gear. I learned at the start, to handle all pre productions outside of the studio. In fact when I do go to track drums or vocals because they have a room or mics I want to use. I bring a two track and then record everything. Then save the stems and get out. Save time and money.