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By mr_debauch Sat Apr 16, 2016 8:22 pm
for sure.. pretty good. I kind of like the straight turntable ones without all the cue points and all that stuff, but it does allow for some really cool stuff to happen.
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By Lampdog Sat Apr 16, 2016 11:04 pm
Yeah, some technology has made it easy to cheat now. I don't like that, but, it is what it is. Paying dues used to be about helping your homies carry 7-10 crates of records to the house party. Paying dues used to be about rolling the same house party with huge ass cerwin vegas in the back of a friends pickup. Paying dues used to be about that penny balance on the cartridge. etc. 1980's, etc.
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By mr_debauch Sun Apr 17, 2016 1:59 am
yeah.. i mean i like the new features on this new dj tech and how it adapted old gear into new workflow.... but clicking buttons to play loops for you in my opinion ha made some of the magic fade away even if the result sounds outstanding.
By BoyOfVirtue Mon Apr 25, 2016 1:59 am
Lampdog wrote:Yeah, some technology has made it easy to cheat now. I don't like that, but, it is what it is. Paying dues used to be about helping your homies carry 7-10 crates of records to the house party. Paying dues used to be about rolling the same house party with huge ass cerwin vegas in the back of a friends pickup. Paying dues used to be about that penny balance on the cartridge. etc. 1980's, etc.


DVS is a must for the working DJ but otherwise I think it's wack. DMC went waaayyy down hill ever since they allowed the use of DVS in the competitions. The cue points allow the DJs to do TOO much, if you know what I mean. Plus accurate needle-drops is a legitimate skill that just gets rendered obsolete.

It sucks because new battle/scratch tool records dont get pressed as often as they used to....most of them just get released for digital download since few people actually buy the wax copies.

Please excuse the rant :oops:

Something like this is where its at for me
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By Lampdog Mon Apr 25, 2016 7:26 pm
BoyOfVirtue wrote:Something like this is where its at for me


I LOVE that and it's exactly what I'm talking about.
Raw skillz, no cue points (Nothing against the new style dj's, I love their **** too).
I respect both, I grew up without all the tech, so it's my first choice to listen to, nostalgic.

Joe Cooley, Cash Money, Egyptian Lover, Uncle Jamms Army, Tony G., Battlecat mid 1980's needed
none of that.
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By Ian Canefire Mon Apr 25, 2016 8:27 pm
I hear you about the tech and the cheats. However this is skill. I like that he did needle dropping also around 2:30.
I miss good dj skill. It makes a party a real event to behold and it adds so much more to songs.

Best DJ I have ever seen and I always talk about him, is DJ Ghetto aka Ken Khaos in Philly.

Cheers,
Ian
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By Mike Boogie Tue Apr 26, 2016 2:13 pm
As a DJ that started with vinyl...jumped head first into PCDJ, Traktor, Virtual Dj with a MixTrack Pro and now a few months ago purchased my NS7mk3 with Serato, I agree that the DVS generation changed everything about DJ'ing.

As soon as I saw Relative Mode used in Serato, I knew it (the turntable age) was over. What's the most daunting skill a DJ needs? Keeping the needle in the groove! Being able to finesse that backspin and scratch techniques are going to be a lost art in the next generation. Turntablism lost a lost of respect when the larger than life "Press Play" DJs went mainstream.

I enjoy being able to have fun in a set without needle jumps, and do some of the tricks I NEVER thought to attempt during a LIVE vinyl set.

Cue Points, Sync Buttons, and software all help with the chores of DJ'ing, but nothing can beat raw skills and DOPE song selections.
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By mr_debauch Tue Apr 26, 2016 6:35 pm
yeah i agree with that... for a live DJ gig where it is utilitarian.. you need that reliability, the music library, still have the tactile edge of a 12 inch platter... and the option to actually throw real vinyl in the mix... you need that these days.. maybe if it isn't a turntablist gig it's just the smart and reliable thing to use... but when the thing we are looking at is the ability to operate turntables to do tricks... push buttons that play your cuts completely takes out the need to use the turntable to do that. I think it's a different sport.. both with similar vehicles
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By Tag One The Fader Fiend Fri Jun 24, 2016 8:18 pm
BoyOfVirtue wrote:It sucks because new battle/scratch tool records dont get pressed as often as they used to....most of them just get released for digital download since few people actually buy the wax copies.


Not true, there is loads of scratch tools hitting the market at the moment from the likes off cut & paste records, Texas Scratch League, DJ Ritchie Rufftones "Practice Yo Cutz" series to name a few :smoker:

The portable scratch scene has taken off big time which is producing loads of dope 7 inch scratch tools at the moment too :smoker: